2007 Conference Program

10th Annual Atmospheric Science Librarians International Conference
San Antonio, TX   January 17-19, 2007
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“Bridge to Knowledge”

BAMS Preview of the 2007 Annual AMS Meeting
Links to the recorded presentations are available at the AMS Conference site.

Wednesday, January 17, 2007
ASLI program and ASLI dinner

8:30am Registration and Coffee
8:50am Welcome Address and Introductions
Susan Tarbell, Chair, Atmospheric Science Librarians International (ASLI)
Jinny Nathans (AMS) presented the welcome address for Susan who could not attend because of the weather.
9:15am Session 1 – ASLI History
Moderator: Susan Tarbell
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary1.1 Celebrating Ten Years of Learning and Networking – The Atmospheric Science Librarians International
Madeleine Needles, Haystack Observatory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Julia H. Triplehorn, Keith B. Mather Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Maria Latyszewskyj, Environment Canada Library
Evelyn Poole-Kober, Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division, Air Resources Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Research Triangle Park, NC

Abstract:
The Atmospheric Science Librarians International was formed to provide an association for individuals having a scientific or technical interest in library and information science, especially as these are applied in the recording, retrieval and dissemination of knowledge and information in the area of atmospheric science; and to promote and improve the communication, dissemination and use of such information and knowledge for the benefit of libraries or other educational organizations. For the past ten years ASLI members have been following this mission by supporting and encouraging the communication and networking between information professionals who work in the many scientific specialties of the atmospheric science field. Through our annual meetings, our discussion list, and our Web site we have exchanged ideas and explored issues that affect all of us. This Tenth Anniversary presentation will highlight the events and people who have built ASLI into the dynamic organization that it is today.Minutes:
Madeleine could not attend because of the weather.

A roundtable presentation on celebrating 10 years of the ASLI.
– Highlights of ASLI’s first conference in 1996 at the AMS in Phoenix, AZ.
– ASLI was started by Judie Triplehorn and Maria Latyszewskyj with Carol Watts
– Keith Seitter of AMS first offered to sponsor the ASLI at the AMS in 1997.
– Lisa Wishard presented a paper on the creation of ASLI at the 1998 meeting of the Polar Library Colloquy at Reykjavik.
– Beginning with the 2nd ASLI meeting in Dallas, there was a focus on increasing memberships.
– The first elections were held with the 3rd ASLI meeting in Long Beach, CA and the first by-laws were drafted.
– In 2001, ASLI became a non-profit organization.
– As a tribute to our many international members, Evelyn Poole-Kober related the many international messages received by ASLI from our international members following 9/11 in 2001.
– Cambridge Scientific Abstracts became a corporate sponsor of ASLI
– 2006 was ASLI’s first Book Choice Award

9:45am Session 2 – Keynote Speakers
Moderator: Jean Phillips
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary2.1. Observations from the “Bridge to Knowledge” by The Weather Guys
Steven Ackerman
Director, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), and Professor, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Jonathan Martin
Chair and Professor, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstract:
Observations from the “Bridge to Knowledge” by The Weather Guys Through differing collaborations with the library, Professors Steven Ackerman and Jonathan Martin offer observations about what has worked for them, given the current research and teaching practices of the atmospheric sciences. In addition to their teaching and research activities, Professors Ackerman and Martin have appeared every month for the past six years on Wisconsin Public Radio as The Weather Guys, to answer questions from anyone on any weather topic – lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, global warming, general circulation. Bring your questions about collaborations and your weather questions, too.

Minutes:
This was a very entertaining presentation by the Weather Guys (who appear on Wisconsin Public Radio) on how librarians help the bridge to knowledge. They wonder what the world would be like without librarians ……chaos!
They talked about their student’s behavior and how librarians can help guide them:
– The top students go beyond what is on the reading list
– Getting students to read scholarly books
– Getting students to read critically
– Getting students to read and cite journal articles…not just take what’s on the web
– CIMSS publishing and how librarians maintain and provide quick access to archived material like historic space photos and weather maps
– Plagiarism is a constant concern and how the weather guys are fighting the battle between citing un-refereed and peer-reviewed documents. Internet references are not what they are looking for in course work.
A lively Q/A session followed including a discussion on:
– Computer vs. physical librarian. Both are vital.
– Importance of librarians
– Global change; the debate about whether the Earth is warming or not is over. Just how much the dice is loaded.
– Plagiarism issues
– Internet sources: there are some authoritative sources, especially government sites like NOAA, NASA, EPA, and USGS.
– Discussion on public access journals. Some scientists prefer to publish non-referred preview papers online rather than peer-review. E.g., Public Library of Science (PLoS).

10:30am Break
10:45am Session 3 – The Language of Atmospheric Science
Moderator: Madeleine Needles
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary3.1. A Climate Lexicon
Alan Stewart, Professor, University of Georgia

Abstract:
This project describes the recent work the author has completed on developing a lexicon of adjectives that can be used to describe weather and climate conditions. This work builds upon the author’s Climate Adjective Rating Scale (CARS), which is a psychological measure used to examine how people use language to characterize their experience of the weather and climate. This project goes beyond the use of the CARS and examines the use of weather and climate adjectives in narratives that depict weather and climate.Minutes:
An informative talk on how humans express weather and climate information. He talked about his development of a lexicon of adjectives that can be used to describe weather and climate conditions. He developed the Climate Adjective Rating Scale (CARS), which is a psychological measure used to examine how people use language to characterize their experience of the weather and climate. The CARS consists of 153 terms; 53 relevant to temperature (hot, warm, etc.); 30 relevant to atmospheric lighting conditions and cloud cover (cloudy, bright, dark); 26 relevant to precipitation; and 47 to weather events. He asks of other words that he can include in the CARS for expressing weather information.

11:15am Session 4 – The History of Atmospheric Science
Moderator: Jinny Nathans
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary4.1. 40 Years of Observations from Geostationary Orbit
W. Paul Menzel, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Minutes:
It was certainly a treat to have Dr. Menzel, a real pioneer in the development of satellite meteorology, come talk to us about the evolution of weather observations from space. He presented some wonderful archive graphics and videos (thanks to Jean Phillips!).
The first weather satellite was NASA’s Applications Technology Satellite-I (ATS-I) launched in 1966 at Cape Canaveral, carrying as its payload, the Spin-Scan Cloud Camera, developed by Dr. Menzel’s colleague Vern Suomi, who started a revolution in satellite meteorology.
He talked about the early days of satellite meteorology including an archive video clip of Dr. Suomi explaining the use of the geostationary orbit for weather observations.
One of the first missions was NASA’s Explorer 1, launched in 1958, which discovered the van Allen radiation belts (to support the first International Geophysical Year (IGY)). Explorer 7 was launched in 1959 and studied the Earth’s radiation budget using instruments from Dr. Suomi and Robert Parent.
He showed some archive video of the first satellite images of cloud motion taken with the TIROS satellite in 1960, which generated the remark from Suomi: “the weather moves – not the satellite”.
In 1967, the first multicolor instrument was launched (the Multicolor Spin Scan Cloud Camera (MSSCC) on ATS-3, which used a blue channel (Dr. Menzel lamented that it’s not used anymore). Subsequent satellites showed day/night imagery, infrared views, weather fax (WEFAX) information, hurricane tracking.
The Europeans were also busy developing geostationary satellites of their own. Meteosat was launched in 1977 and included the first water vapor channel.
The Japanese launched GMS-1 for the First Global GARP Experiment (FGGE) in 1979. The US, Europeans, Japanese and Russians have all cooperated in the use of geostationary satellites. At one point, the U.S. shared the European Meteosat when one of the GOES satellites failed.
As Dr. Menzel said, he would not have been able to pull this presentation together if it weren’t for librarians archiving and maintaining these wonderful collections of historical photos, documents and videos.

11:45am Lunch
1:00pm 4.2. George Washington Carver as a Volunteer Weather Observer
Doria Grimes, Chief Contract Operations, NOAA Central LibraryAbstract:
From Nov. 1899 through Jan. 1932, daily weather observations were submitted from Tuskegee, Alabama, on government Form 1009 as part of the Cooperative Observer Program. Most of these daily observations were handwritten and signed by George Washington Carver. How was he able to execute daily weather observations in conjunction with his teaching, travel, and research activities with peanuts, pecans, soybeans, fertilizers, cotton, etc? Did he labor as meticulously with this data as he did with his agricultural products? Not really! A review of correspondence to and from Carver and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau reveal interesting facets of his personality and accomplishments during this period. The Tuskegee weather observations have been imaged and are now available online at: http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/gw_carver_tuskegee/data_rescue_tuskegee_observations.html. Funding for this project was made available from the NOAA Climate Database Modernization Program and the National Oceanographic Data Center.Minutes:
Doria gave a fascinating glimpse into George Washington Carver as a dedicated weather observer. From Nov. 1899 through Jan. 1932, daily weather observations were submitted from Tuskegee, Alabama, on government Form 1009 as part of the Cooperative Observer Program. Most of these daily observations were handwritten and signed by George Washington Carver. Doria showed samples of his observations in his own hand and also provided some copies. Dr. Carver was highly accomplished, conducting extensive research in agriculture as well as his weather observations that he sent to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau. Doria presented some revealing correspondence between the Weather Bureau and Dr. Carver. He had a “shed” to conduct his observations, but apparently the site where it was located at Tuskegee University cannot be found.
The Tuskegee weather observations have been imaged and are now available online at http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/gw_carver_tuskegee/data_rescue_tuskegee_observations.html
1:30pm 4.3. The Papers of Guy Stewart Callendar: A digital archive on DVD
James Rodger Fleming
Professor of Science, Technology and Society, Colby College, MaineAbstract:
G.S. Callendar is noted for establishing the carbon dioxide theory of climate change. This presentation introduces a digital archive (DVD) of his manuscript letters, papers, journals, documents, and family photographs, including his extensive compilation of weather and climate data. Organized into eight volumes, this research-quality collection is a perfect companion to Callendar’s biography. It is an essential tool for historians, climate scientists, and other scholars interested in climatic change and a desirable acquisition for libraries. Both the DVD and Callendar’s biography have just been published by the American Meteorological Society.Minutes:
Guy Stewart Callendar (1898-1964) established the CO2 theory of climate change, known as the Callendar Effect (e.g. see http://www.aip.org/history/climate/co2.htm). Mr. Fleming produced a digital archive (DVD) of Callendar’s manuscript letters, papers, journals, documents, and family photographs, including his extensive compilation of weather and climate data (published by the AMS). The DVD is organized into eight volumes. It is an essential tool for historians, climate scientists, and other scholars interested in climatic change and a desirable acquisition for libraries.
2:00pm 4.4. Collection Management and Older Materials
Jinny Nathans, Archivist, American Meteorological Society
Chris Sherratt, Lindgren Library, Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyMinutes:
Chris reported on a large collection of meteorological material found in the MIT library (MIT had the first university meteorological department). There are a number of monographs, atlases, serials, journals, etc. and a major question is how to make decisions as to its retention. Are there other copies of this material available elsewhere? Are any of the materials online (or should it be made available online)? What might ASLI do to help preserve this material? No easy answers, but the talk generated a lot of discussion.
2:30pm Break
Join Susan Tarbell, ASLI Chair; Keith Seitter, AMS Executive Director and ASLI members at the ASLI Booth during the break for a special cake-cutting ceremony in celebration of ASLI’s 10th Anniversary.
3:00pm Session 5 – Electronic Access to Atmospheric Science Information
Moderator: Gene Major
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary5.1. The New Model for Library Services at the Environmental Protection Agency
Evelyn Poole-Kober
Librarian, Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division, Air Resources Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Abstract:
For the past three years, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has looked at ways to modernize and improve the way it provides library services to its employees and the public. During this time, the trend has shown a shift in the way people request and receive library services at the agency. The agency has found that more people want information electronically. These trends have suggested that EPA needs to use technology to improve library services and streamline its libraries. This paper will look at the new model and the manner in which library services will be delivered.Minutes:
In the current climate of reduced library services, the EPA has looked at ways to modernize and improve the way it provides library services to its employees and the public. The trend is towards more electronic services, which patrons seem to want. A major challenge is using electronic technologies to deliver information to users. The EPA needs to continue to provide access to EPA documents through traditional, electronic and InterLibrary Loan (ILL) services. More and more information is being posted on EPA web sites. Evelyn talked about the EPA Desktop Library that can be accessed by EPA staff directly from their computers. The desktop allows access to the full text of scientific and policy journals, reports, newspapers, reference works, databases and more. The site includes several news, business and scientific databases from the Dialog Corporation, plus 5 newsletters from InsideEPA.com, including the Inside EPA Weekly Report. Information about the EPA libraries can be found here: http://www.epa.gov/libraries/.

3:30pm 5.2. From the Warehouse to the Information Super Highway: Digitizing NOAA Documents
Kari Kozak
Graduate Student, Library Science, University of North Carolina-Chapel HillAbstract:
As a research intern at the Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division Library at Research Triangle Park, NC, Ms. Kozak has scanned NOAA documents to be Section 508 compliant, added metadata to the records, and provided links from the NOAALINC catalog.Minutes:
Kari is a graduate student and served as an intern at the Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division Library at Research Triangle Park, NC under the direction of Evelyn Poole-Kober. Kari talked about her experiences in scanning NOAA documents, checking for Section 508 compliance, adding metadata to the records, and providing links from the NOAALINC catalog (www.lib.noaa.gov/uhtbin/webcat).
4:00pm 5.3. Update on Digitization of Air Force Documents: A New Portal
Susan A. Tarbell, Cataloging Librarian, Air Force Weather Technical Library, Air Force Combat Climatology Center, Asheville, NCAbstract:
Library staff recently finished a 2-year project to digitize all documents published by Air Force Weather units. All of these documents have been cataloged onto the Library Management System (Sirsi). Most documents are available at the Library’s website in full text mode. This talk presents the “portal” on how to find and download them.Minutes:
Susan could not attend because of the weather. The abstract of her presentation is here:
http://ams.confex.com/ams/87ANNUAL/techprogram/paper_121959.htm
4:30pm ASLI’s Choice Book Awards
Presentation at ASLI Booth in the Exhibit Hall. Open until 6:30
6:00pm Annual ASLI Dinner
Location to be announced, sponsored by Cambridge Scientific Abstracts

Thursday, January 18, 2007
ASLI program, vendor updates, business meeting

8:30am Coffee
8:45am Session 6- Information Retrieval in the Atmospheric Sciences
Moderator: Brian Voss
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary6.1. MGA Advanced Searching Techniques Workshop
Vicki Soto
Supervising Editor, Aquatic and Meteorological Sciences, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA)

Abstract:
The Workshop Outline includes: 1). CSA Illumina Administration Tools – linking to catalogs and full text, default displays; 2) Usage Report System – different views of reports to allow librarians to see how clients are using CSA Illumina; 3) Online source list; 4) Quick and Advanced Search techniques; 5) Search tools – browsable indexes, controlled vocabulary, rotating display, search history and alerts; 6) Results display – customizing views, marking records, document type tabs; 7) Save, Print, Email – downloading material, QuickBibs, emailing results.Minutes:
Vicki discussed several new features at CSA including the CSA Illumina Administration Tools, the Usage Report System, the Online source list, Quick and Advanced Search techniques, Search tools, and Results display including tools to save, print, and email results. The CSA Illumina Administration Tool helps librarians manage and support their CSA subscriptions, including MGA. This is a highly customizable tool that library administrators can tailor to their specific needs.

9:30am Session 7- Forensic Aspects of Meteorology
Moderator: Maria Latyszewskyj
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary7.1. CSI Downsview: Creative Scene Investigation
Phil Chadwick, Meteorologist

Abstract:
Creative Scene Investigation (CSI) investigates the passion of Canadian artists for weather as well as the meteorology behind some of the finest work ever produced. These artists were honest and accurate observers of their inspiration: quite simply, the natural world around them. The science of forensic meteorology applied through CSI uncovers the secrets locked in the details recorded on canvas. Specific deals about their location, direction of view and the weather before, during and after recording the scene can be sleuthed. To attempt to appreciate this art without first putting it into the context of the natural world would be missing the point of the artist. CSI will be a fun and unique look at the work of Canadian artists.Minutes:
This was a fascinating and informative presentation on investigating the meteorology behind the paintings of some famous Canadian painters in the early part of the century. This session attracted a lot of attendees, as the room was nearly full.
Creative Scene Investigation (CSI) investigates the passion of Canadian artists for weather as well as the meteorology behind some of the finest work ever produced. These artists were honest and accurate observers of their inspiration: quite simply, the natural world around them. The science of forensic meteorology applied through CSI uncovers the secrets locked in the details recorded on canvas. Specific details about their location, direction of view and the weather before, during and after recording the scene can be sleuthed. To attempt to appreciate this art without first putting it into the context of the natural world would be missing the point of the artist.

10:00am Break
10:15am Session 8- AMS Update
Moderator: Susan Tarbell
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary8.1 Welcome address
Keith Seitter, Executive Director

Minutes:
Keith graciously welcomed the ASLI to the AMS meeting. He presented information on the AMS Preprint and Abstract.
He reported that the AMS recently joined The Research Channel (www.researchchannel.org) a non-profit coalition of organizations.
The process for submitting abstracts to the AMS are:
– 2-4 pages prior to the conference
– Author submits short abstract (about 300 words)
– If accepted, then authors do an extended abstract
Only 50% of authors submit an extended abstract. Supposedly they consider this as “gray literature” and do not count towards tenure. The abstracts are not peer-reviewed and take time to produce with little benefit.

Current trends:
– Eliminate the CD-ROM preprint
– Restructure fees with no additional charge to authors
– Use the online database as best final resource
– Strong commitment to peer-review, but less commitment to conference materials

Question from attendee: Will AMS pre-record talk especially for authors that could not attend because of weather. Response: Something to look into.

8.2. AMS Publishing Update
Ken Heideman
Director of Publications, American Meteorological Society

Minutes:
Kenneth talked about the trend to going electronic and transitioning from print to online.
Online subscriptions rather then print is the trend that AMS will follow.
Question: What about developing countries? Response: Many are requesting online subscriptions. Currently about 50/50.
Question: Comment on Portico (http://www.portico.org/index.html) vs. JSTOR. AMS has gone to Portico archival services as it preserves the content and format.

8.3 AMS Book Publishing Update
Sarah Jane Shangraw
Book and Monograph Manager, American Meteorological Society

Minutes:
Sarah presented new and upcoming publications from AMS. In 2007-2008 expect to see:
– The Weather Book by Jack Williams (an update of the USA Today book)
– The Forgiving Air by Richard Somerville
– Science Communication by Daniel Schultz
How can AMS inform ASLI of new releases?

8.4. BAMS Update
Jeff Rosenfeld
Editor, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS)

Minutes:
Jeff talked about getting more BAMS online; using a Google-powered search of the BAMS archive. BAMS is online at Allen Press, but not all content is there. AMS is working on making more content available.
– How are people using BAMS? Seems to be a consensus that this publication has a lot of usage for the print version.
– Attendees also asked if BAMS could include more job opportunities and how students can find out about jobs.
– Perhaps Google Scholar can pick up AMS journals?
– Can ASLI provide annotated bibliographies for students to include in BAMS?
What current awareness sources are used?

11:45am Lunch
1:00pm Session 9- Vendor Updates
Moderator: Evelyn Poole-Kober
Minutes submitted by Gene Major, ASLI Secretary9.1 Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (MGA)
Craig Emerson
Vice President Editorial Operation, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA)
Vicki Soto
Supervising Editor’ Aquatic and Meteorological Sciences, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA)

Minutes:
Vicki and Craig from CSA talked about some of the resources available at CSA.
– Factsheets are available for all CSA publications (http://www.csa.com/e_products/databases-collections.php).
– For MGA, the factsheet is: (http://www.csa.com/factsheets/mga-set-c.php) and there is also a Discovery Guide.

Craig talked about CSA Illustrata, a new service that utilizes deep indexing of figures and tables in articles (http://info.csa.com/csaillustrata)
– Traditional search is becoming increasingly insufficient; full text is inaccurate.
– Deep indexing of figures and tables represent the research and data.
– Illustrata includes thumbnails of all figures and tables in the article
– Indexing process: Machine Assisted Indexing => Manual Indexing => Indexing Review
– Over 1 million records indexed

9.2 American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Nina Tristani
Group Manager, Marketing and Membership, American Geophysical Union

Minutes: Nina could not attend and the talk was given by David Hartogs, Marketing Coordinator for AGU.
– Ongoing discussion on open access to AGU journals.
– AGU has their own archives.
– AGU publishes about 20 books/year.
– The online AGU journal is the journal of record.
– The print AGU journal will disappear eventually.

9.3 Web of Science, Thomson Scientific
Paul Torpey
Global Sales Support Manager, Thomson Scientific

Minutes: Paul talked about upgrades to the Web of Knowledge:
– Refine results
– Analyze results
– Distinct author identification
– EndNoteWeb will be able to transfer results to your desktop End Note.
– Web Citation Index – searches the grey literature and is kept separate from the peer-review (Web of Science)

9.4 Wiley InterScience
Alexy Dugan, John Wiley

Minutes: Alexy talked about some of the latest publications:
– Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society
– Online to 2002
– New print size, layout and cover design
– International Journal of Climate
– Weather magazine
– Membership magazine for subscribers to QJRMS
– Available for non-members
– Online through 2002
– Atmospheric Science Letters
– Meteorological Applications
– Online to 1997
– New print size, layout and cover design

Backlisted publications:
– QJRMS to 1871
– Met. Apps to 1994
– Int. J. Climate to 1981
– Over 314,000 pages for a one-time fee

Online Books:
– 25 new titles
– Example: A Climate Modelling Primer, 3rd ed.
– 2 primary options: One Time + flex subscription fee

3:15pm Break
3:30pm Session 7 – ASLI Business Meeting
5:00pm ASLI Sessions end for the day

Friday, January 19, 2007
Annual ASLI Field Trip

8:30am-4:30pm Annual ASLI Field Trip
Southwest Research Institute
Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research
Daughters of the Republic of Texas at the Alamo
Lunch at historic hotel.